An analysis of leaves of grass by walt whitman

One of the poems in his first edition of Leaves of Grass, eventually called "There Was a Child Went Forth," can be read as a statement of Whitman's educational philosophycelebrating unrestricted extracurricular learning, an openness to experience and ideas that would allow for endless absorption of variety and difference: Whitman and Vaughan, a young Irish stage driver, clearly had an intense relationship at this time, perhaps inspiring the sequence of homoerotic love poems Whitman called "Live Oak, with Moss," poems that would become the heart of his Calamus cluster, which appeared in the edition of Leaves.

Even the colours seem muted, and the light seems to be fading throughout the first stanza, shedding light only for a moment; as we read, the extravagance seems to be withering.

Periodically, Whitman expressed outrage at practices that furthered slavery itself: The edition sold fairly well, with the first printing of a thousand copies quickly exhausted and an additional printing totaling at least a thousand and perhaps as many as three or four thousand more copies promptly ordered by Thayer and Eldridge.

He also met a number of abolitionist writers who would soon become close friends and supporters, including William Douglas O'Connor and John Townsend Trowbridge, both of whom would later write at length about Whitman. Whitman had in fact been visiting Broadway Hospital for several years, comforting injured stage drivers and ferryboat workers serious injuries in the chaotic transportation industry in New York at the time were common.

He did not hesitate to use his own poems—which he was by this time writing with some frequency, though they were rhymed, conventional verses that indicated nothing of the innovative poetry to come—as texts in his classroom.

The Walt Whitman Archive

It is safe now from war with "its voyage closed and done, from fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won". However, even after his move to Brooklyn, he remained connected to New York: Actaeon spied on Diana in the bath, and Diana cursed him with becoming a stag, who was torn to pieces by his own hounds.

The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

After the excitement of Brooklyn and New York, these often isolated Long Island towns depressed Whitman, and he recorded his disdain for country people in a series of letters not discovered until the s that he wrote to a friend named Abraham Leech: Like virtually all of the abrupt changes in his life, this one came with no planning, no advance notice, no preparation.

In February he saw Abraham Lincoln pass through New York on the way to his inauguration, and in April he was walking home from an opera performance when he bought a newspaper and read the headlines about Southern forces firing on Fort Sumter.

The audacity of that final line remains striking. Famous passages on "Dilation," on "True noble expanding American character," and on the "soul enfolding orbs" are memorable prose statements that express the newly expansive sense of self that Whitman was discovering, and we find him here creating the conditions—setting the tone and articulating the ideas—that would allow for the writing of Leaves of Grass.

In a stunningly short time—reportedly in fifteen minutes—McClure struck a deal with Whitman and provided him with an advance to cover his travel expenses to New Orleans. Whitman is a major part of the reason that America's literary center moved from Boston to New York in the second half of the nineteenth century, but in the superior power of Boston was still evident in its influential publishing houses, its important journals including the new Atlantic Monthlyand its venerable authors including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, whom Whitman met briefly while in town.

He was adding to his accomplishments, moving beyond being a respectable journalist and developing literary talents and aspirations. The volume, which was presented for an international audience, attempted to present Whitman as representative of an America that accepts people of all groups.

The Fowler brothers distributed the first edition of Leaves of Grass, published the second anonymously, and provided a venue in their firm's magazine for one of Whitman's self-reviews.

Otherwise what is there to defend. Defense of our resources is just as important as defense abroad. It was this amputation, this fragmenting of the Union—in both a literal and figurative sense—that Whitman would address for the next few years, as he devoted himself to becoming the arms and legs of the wounded and maimed soldiers in the Civil War hospitals.

It was what Whitman called "al fresco" poetry, poetry written outside the walls, the bounds, of convention and tradition. Newspaper work made him happy, but teaching did not, and two years later, he abruptly quit his job as an itinerant schoolteacher.

The act of crossing became, for Whitman, one of the most evocative events in his life—at once practical, enjoyable, and mystical. The idyllic Long Island countryside formed a sharp contrast to the crowded energy of the quickly growing Brooklyn-New York City urban center.

He gets to love them. The America that Whitman would write of after the Civil War would be a more chastened, less innocent nation, a nation that had gone through its baptism in blood and one that would from now on be tested against the stern measure of this bloodshed.

The Walt Whitman Archive

Whitman also began in the late s to become a regular at Pfaff's saloon, a favorite hangout for bohemian artists in New York. His democratic belief in the importance of all the parts of any whole, was central to his vision: But in fact Whitman did travel again to Southold, writing some remarkably unperturbed journalistic pieces about the place in the late s and early s.

Walt Whitman was born in and died inand the American Civil War was the central event of his life. Here there is vivid and darker imagery such as "his lips are pale and still" and the reader can picture the dead Captain lying there still and motionless with "no pulse nor will".

My Captain", and "fallen cold and dead". Leaves of Grass was not a book that set out to shock the reader so much as to merge with the reader and make him or her more aware of the body each reader inhabited, to convince us that the body and soul were conjoined and inseparable, just as Whitman's ideas were embodied in words that had physical body in the ink and paper that readers held physically in their hands.

Schoolteaching Years His unlikely next career was that of a teacher. He enjoyed the "splendid and roomy bars" with "exquisite wines, and the perfect and mild French brandy" that were packed with soldiers who had recently returned from the war with Mexico, and his first encounters with young men who had seen battle, many of them recovering from war wounds, occurred in New Orleans, a precursor of his Civil War experiences.

The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

"O Captain! My Captain!" is an extended metaphor poem written in by Walt Whitman, about the death of American president Abraham Lincoln. The poem was first published in the pamphlet Sequel to Drum-Taps which assembled 18 poems regarding the American Civil War, including another Lincoln elegy, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd".It was included in Whitman.

[ Top of Page] A Short History of the World - by H.G. Wells, - "Wells's two-volume Outline of History published in was the first general history constructed on an evolutionary, sociological, and anthropological basis. It was immensely popular and set the basis for this Short History, which Wells created 'to meet the needs of the busy general reader, too driven to study the maps and.

ENVIRONMENTAL QUOTES

“Generations of readers have turned to Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass for its nature poetry. Now Howard Nelson has given us, in one slim volume, the best of Whitman’s nature writing.

The Death of My Best Friend - I remember an old saying my mother used to tell me, “Never say never”. Is this true. I would have never expected this to be true till something happened to me that changed my life till this very day. Family Origins. Walt Whitman, arguably America's most influential and innovative poet, was born into a working class family in West Hills on Long Island, on May 31,just thirty years after George Washington was inaugurated as the first president of the newly formed United States.

“Generations of readers have turned to Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass for its nature poetry. Now Howard Nelson has given us, in one slim volume, the best of Whitman.

An analysis of leaves of grass by walt whitman
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